Tag: 上海推油按摩

University of California system completes fossil fuel divestment effort

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Los Angeles Times:The University of California announced Tuesday that it has fully divested from all fossil fuels, the nation’s largest educational institution to do so as campaigns to fight climate change through investment strategies proliferate at campuses across the country.The UC milestone capped a five-year effort to move the public research university system’s $126-billion portfolio into more environmentally sustainable investments, such as wind and solar energy. UC officials say their strategy is grounded in concerns about the planet’s future and in what makes financial sense.“As long-term investors, we believe the university and its stakeholders are much better served by investing in promising opportunities in the alternative energy field rather than gambling on oil and gas,” Richard Sherman, chair of the UC Board of Regents’ investments committee, said in a statement.The UC action is groundbreaking, environmentalists said, because of the size of its investment portfolio and its massive teaching and research enterprise, which educates 285,000 students.Sherman and Jagdeep Singh Bachher, UC’s chief investment officer, announced the university’s intention to go fossil free in an L.A. Times op-ed article last September. “Our job is to make money for the University of California, and we’re betting we can do that without fossil fuels investment,” they wrote.Bachher announced Tuesday that UC has sold more than $1 billion in fossil fuel assets from its pension, endowment and working capital pools and surpassed its five-year goal of investing $1 billion in clean energy projects. He said his team is convinced that investments in fossil fuels pose an “unacceptable financial risk,” particularly with “geopolitical tensions and likely, a bumpy and slow global financial recovery in a post-pandemic world.”[Teresa Watanabe]More: UC becomes nation’s largest university to divest fully from fossil fuels University of California system completes fossil fuel divestment effortlast_img read more

38,000 miles of trail: 18 Thru-Hikes

first_img“I set the terms. It was not imprisonment. I set my own commitment. No one was telling me to do this,” Doyle says. “It’s just a whole different mindset to walk the entire Appalachian Trail. It’s not recreational. Now, I’m just hiking when I feel like it.” Doyle quickly fell behind his schedule but caught back up in Vermont. By the time he reached Katahdin, he’d set the speed record for the Appalachian Trail. “Warren spends a lot of time on the emotional and mental preparation,” Pharr-Davis says. “I learned how to think about the trail, and to realize that I would have to be really adaptable but also really stubborn. He talked a lot about reasons why people quit. It’s often that they’re not having fun, or miss someone at home, or the trail is something other than they thought it would be. You go through that very thoroughly, and it helps you anticipate emotional hurdles you’ll encounter on the trail.” Upon completing his record-breaking hike, Doyle received a chilly reception from the Appalachian Mountain Club in Connecticut.  “I had to do something that no one was telling me to do—no rewards, no cheerleaders, no scholarships, something I wasn’t going to get paid for, or any extrinsic reward,” Doyle says. Doyle persisted in his efforts to give back to the trail by sharing it with others. He started a group that hiked the Connecticut stretch of the trail by tackling it on seven consecutive Sundays in the fall. On a lark, somebody suggested doing all 56 miles in a 24-hour period, and so Doyle led his first expedition of 12 people along the trail. He expanded the idea to the entire trail, leading expeditions of thru-hikers for decades to come.  “I think he’s probably up there in the top three or five most important hikers,” says Cindy Ross, a friend of Doyle and triple crown backpacker who has completed the Appalachian Trail, Pacific Crest Trail  and the Continental Divide Trail. “There’s a lot of people who know who Warren Doyle is and treat him like a legend. Benton MacKaye and Myron Avery and the people who created the trail are very important, and Earl Shaffer, the first guy to hike the trail. And I think Warren Doyle is right up there with them.” Doyle sunk his life savings into his 5-acre folk school, and that’s where he plans to spend the remainder of his warm seasons. In the winter, he rents leftover timeshares for $7 per night, “living in the lap of luxury in Ocean City, Myrtle Beach, using someone else’s WiFi and TV.”  “The thing I believe is noteworthy is that I’m not a trust fund baby,” Doyle says. “I don’t collect benefits. I was a first-generation college student. I traversed the Appalachian Trail 18 times without ever losing a job. I raised two kids and helped put them through college. And that, that demographic is pretty amazing.” “His legacy is very much like the topography of the trail, with ups and downs, highs and lows, and a very real very human journey,” Pharr-Davis says. “The Appalachian Trail has a lot of personalities connected to it throughout its history and its duration, but I think there’s only going to be one Warren Doyle.” Warren Doyle hangs up his boots after 38,000 miles on the A.T. Doyle was just 13 when his 16-year-old sister died of a brain aneurysm. He set out to make up her loss to his parents by becoming an achiever. He became the first of his family to go to college, and the summer after his junior year he won a work scholarship from the American Friends Service Committee, a Quaker peace and social justice organization, to work in a boys orphanage in the mountains of interior Jamaica. The next year, the Quakers sent him to Don West’s folk school in southern West Virginia. Although Doyle continued college, earning his master’s degree and beginning a Ph.D. program, his time in Jamaica and Appalachia kept gnawing at him. Through the ‘80s and ‘90s, Doyle raised his children, focused on higher education, and completed two section hikes by knocking out 30 to 35 miles per day over two- to three-week periods every year. He conducted group thru-hike expeditions through the 2000s.center_img “They’d have nothing of me because I walked the trail ‘the wrong way,’” Doyle says. “I didn’t see anything because I walked too fast. I didn’t walk too fast; I walked 15 to 17 hours per day at 2 miles an hour. That’s not walking fast, it’s walking long.” “A 46-year-old love affair ended last summer,” he says, staring at me across a hardwood table at his folk school in eastern Tennessee, midway between Mountain City and Damascus, Virginia. Doyle is celebrating the completion of 18 thru-hikes of the Appalachian Trail, but his final 100 miles were the toughest. On his 18th thru-hike last year, Doyle wasn’t sure he could complete the 100-mile section from the White Mountains to Mount Katahdin. Now, he’s finished with that era of his life. Pharr-Davis says Doyle’s impact on the trail has evolved over time—as a record setter, for his outspoken opinions, and through his training programs. “That first hike, I was somewhat naive,” Doyle says. “It was hard. I cried a lot. I had the determination. Thank God I had the temperament. And I was open. I said to the trail, ‘Do what you will with me. I trust everything about you.’ I trust the trail. I trust the mountains. It knows no institutional restraints. It will help you live in harmony with yourself.” Doyle may be done with thru-hiking, but he’s continuing to run his Appalachian Trail Institute and folk school. And the trail he blazed has made him a legend among the thru-hiking community. So in 1969, at age 23, he set out on his first thru-hike. Warren Doyle’s 18 thru-hikes of the Appalachian Trail came between between 1969 and 2018. The first set a speed record. Not only did Doyle leave a mark with his own hikes, but he’s also trained a generation of hikers through his Appalachian Trail Institute. Jennifer Pharr-Davis attended the institute before the first of her three (so far) thru-hikes. Doyle called a contra dance at her 2008 wedding, and he played a supporting role in her record-setting 2011 hike. It turned out he could—you hike with your legs, not your belly, as he says. But the completion marked Doyle’s final thru-hike.  “I’ve never been so nervous about a hike. I’ve hiked over 38,000 miles of trail. All I had was 100 miles left, and I didn’t know whether I could do it or not.” Warren Doyle knows how this story should begin. “I decided to lead a life of practical poverty from age of 60 for the rest of my life,” Doyle says with a grin. “It’s another great adventure.”last_img read more

Advance the new lending experience with integrated technology

first_imgGrowing your loan portfolio requires detailed knowledge of target members.by: Harvey FosterLending has been reinvented over the past several years, as regulatory demands have substantially increased the expenses and operational requirements for doing business.As a result, the cost of originating mortgages has tripled over the past decade, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association’s Quarterly Performance Report.Despite additional requirements and oversight, there are still significant opportunities for credit unions right now. According to market data highlighted in a May 2015 report by Raddon Financial Group (part of Fiserv), there is an estimated $1.2 trillion market for mortgage originations this year—a 7.1% increase over 2014.This growth can be attributed to a positive outlook from consumers, which may also drive demand for an array of other loan types, such as home equity, auto, and business.In order to capitalize on the strong consumer demand, credit unions need to align their products to meet borrowers’ unique needs. Additionally, as consumers are increasingly embracing the “do-it-yourself” approach to financial services, credit unions must also have the technology in place to enable self-service options for loan shopping and applications. continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Cancellation Due to Weather

first_imgCancellation due to lightning is a no brainer.  I am not sure if the half hour rule is always a necessity; however, being on the safe side is certainly understandable.  However, what about sports like cross country, baseball, or softball which have to play or run on some non grassy surfaces?  Last weekend, for instance, a lot of high school cross country invitationals took place despite the horrible conditions on most courses.Football and soccer could be added to this list if they do not have good grassy surface.  When you try to run or make starts and stops in wet, muddy conditions the threat of injury becomes very high.  For instance, at a cross country meet at Brown County High School last Saturday, the athletes not only had to run in mud but they also ran through areas where standing water was more than 6 inches deep.  Kids were falling, sliding down hills, loosing their shoes, and collecting enough mud on themselves and uniforms to start a garden.  How about the coach or bus driver who was responsible for cleaning the bus after they brought these kids back?  There are no locker rooms available for showers at Cross Country meets.  I know re-scheduling is usually impossible, but cancellation is a smarter choice!last_img read more